Oral health linked to brain health, study finds


A study found that poor oral health increases the risk of different brain problems, such as stroke, dementia and cognitive decline.

A study found that poor oral health increases the risk of different brain problems, such as stroke, dementia and cognitive decline.

Published in NeurologyStudies have found that periodontitis or tooth loss can cause parts of the brain to shrink (degenerate) as we age.

That’s because poor oral health can affect the health of your hippocampus—the part of the brain involved in memory, learning, and emotion. The hippocampus is also susceptible to Alzheimer's disease.

The study involved 172 people aged 55 or older with no memory problems in Ohasama, Japan. At the start of the study, each participant had a dental exam to check for periodontitis, a memory test and an MRI scan to measure the volume of the hippocampus. Four years later, the participants had a second MRI scan to measure the extent of cognitive decline.

The results showed an association between the number of teeth and the extent of periodontitis and changes in the hippocampus.

For those with mild periodontitis, the findings showed that the brain shrank at a faster rate when they had fewer teeth. However, for people with more severe periodontitis, those with more teeth had faster brain shrinkage.

'Hard for the brain'

The study's researchers are from the Department of Aging and Geriatric Dentistry at Tohoku University in Japan. Because tooth loss and periodontitis are common problems, the team thought it was important to investigate their links to brain problems.

Satoshi Yamaguchi is the study author. “Keeping healthier teeth without periodontal disease may help protect brain health,” he said. “Keeping more teeth is important, but keeping more teeth with severe periodontal disease may be harmful to the brain.”

“It has also been suggested that the pathogens of periodontal disease themselves may invade the brain and damage neural tissue. Having fewer teeth reduces the stimulation of chewing, which can also lead to brain atrophy.

“Keeping more teeth is important, but keeping more teeth with severe periodontal disease may be harmful to the brain.” Regular dental visits are important to control the progression of periodontal disease, and teeth with severe periodontal disease may need Remove and replace dentures with appropriate ones.


What do you think of this story?touch [email protected]

Follow Dentistry.co.uk on Instagram to stay up to date with all the latest dental news and trends.





Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *